ICT in Education Toolkit

Mapping Readiness of the Education Sector for ICT Interventions

Mapping of ICT-in-Education Policies, Plans and Projects  No information available

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Summarize policies and plans that specifically address the use of ICTs to enhance teaching and learning



List and summarize large-scale* ICT-related projects that are already being implemented or will be soon implemented regarding ICTs in education.

* Large-scale projects are defined as countrywide, statewide, and regional projects

Data Collection Information
Data Source (if applicable)

Annotations on data

Additional comments

 
  Mapping of ICT-in-Education Policies, Plans and Projects
 


Step 1: Mapping of ICT-in-Education Policies, Plans and Projects

Extract from collected documents and expert input information related the policies, plans and projects related to the ICT sector. Summarize in the following form:

If you wish to upload the completed Print Form document to the Filing Cabinet:

  • Download the print form onto your hard drive, complete and save;
  • Go to the Filing Cabinet and select "Upload documents for Tool "
  • If you wish to replace a file, delete the old file first, and then upload the new version.
  • If you wish to have multiple versions of the same file, give each file a unique name, and follow the above process.


Preparedness of Education Sector for ICT Interventions

The purpose of this questionnaire is to provide a rough profile of the preparedness and capacity of the education sector for effective ICT interventions. Such a profile will help in making decisions for ICTs in education that are realistic and appropriate. On the other hand, the profile may indicate that the pre-requisites for effective ICTs in education are not in place, and action is needed to ensure effective returns on any ICT-related intervention and investment.

Under each profile indicator, there are five descriptors that fall along a continuum. Select one descriptor that best describes the current situation, although it may not represent the desired or prescribed goal.

Hardware Availability
  All schools in the country/region have at least one radio; television sets in schools are rare or inexistent.
  All schools in the country/region have radio; television sets are not common but can be available if needed; computers are rare or nonexistent.
  The majority of schools in the country/region have access to radio and television; computers are limited to wealthy areas or magnet schools.
  Radio, television and computers are found in most schools in the country, but the ratio of computer to students is very low (e.g. 1 computer for 50 students); Internet connection is nonexistent or limited to wealthy areas and specially designated schools.
  The majority of schools in the country have access to radio, television and computers. The number of computers per student is increasing; Internet connectivity is still limited but is expanding.

Quality of Infrastructure and Hardware
  In the majority of the schools, radio reception is of poor quality; transmission of image or sound via phone lines is not available.
  The majority of the schools have capabilities to receive good radio transmission but nothing else (television transmission is precarious; phone connections are unreliable).
  The majority of schools have color television and computers that are old (old software); dial-up connections are either unavailable or support only simple text and graphics.
  The majority of schools have color television, computers with CD-ROM and capability for transfer speeds of up to 56 Kps. for text, graphics, and sound.
  The majority of schools have capabilities to maintain high-speed transfers (cable, DSL, etc) that offer complex graphics and images, video, and audio.

Support/financing for ICT projects
  No public funds are in place to help schools finance ICT-related projects.
  Public funds to finance ICTs in education projects are insufficient.
  Public funds to finance ICT-related projects are available and schools benefit from them easily.
  ICT-related projects are well supported by public and private funds.
Preparedness of Education Sector for ICT Interventions

The purpose of this questionnaire is to provide a rough profile of the preparedness and capacity of the education sector for effective ICT interventions. Such a profile will help in making decisions for ICTs in education that are realistic and appropriate. On the other hand, the profile may indicate that the pre-requisites for effective ICTs in education are not in place, and action is needed to ensure effective returns on any ICT-related intervention and investment.

Under each profile indicator, there are five descriptors that fall along a continuum. Select one descriptor that best describes the current situation, although it may not represent the desired or prescribed goal.

Hardware Availability
  All schools in the country/region have at least one radio; television sets in schools are rare or inexistent.
  All schools in the country/region have radio; television sets are not common but can be available if needed; computers are rare or nonexistent.
  The majority of schools in the country/region have access to radio and television; computers are limited to wealthy areas or magnet schools.
  Radio, television and computers are found in most schools in the country, but the ratio of computer to students is very low (e.g. 1 computer for 50 students); Internet connection is nonexistent or limited to wealthy areas and specially designated schools.
  The majority of schools in the country have access to radio, television and computers. The number of computers per student is increasing; Internet connectivity is still limited but is expanding.

Quality of Infrastructure and Hardware
  In the majority of the schools, radio reception is of poor quality; transmission of image or sound via phone lines is not available.
  The majority of the schools have capabilities to receive good radio transmission but nothing else (television transmission is precarious; phone connections are unreliable).
  The majority of schools have color television and computers that are old (old software); dial-up connections are either unavailable or support only simple text and graphics.
  The majority of schools have color television, computers with CD-ROM and capability for transfer speeds of up to 56 Kps. for text, graphics, and sound.
  The majority of schools have capabilities to maintain high-speed transfers (cable, DSL, etc) that offer complex graphics and images, video, and audio.

Support/financing for ICT projects
  No public funds are in place to help schools finance ICT-related projects.
  Public funds to finance ICTs in education projects are insufficient.
  Public funds to finance ICT-related projects are available and schools benefit from them easily.
  ICT-related projects are well supported by public and private funds.
 
  Mapping Preparedness of the Education Sector for ICT Interventions
 


Step 2: Mapping Preparedness of the Education Sector for ICT Interventions

Mapping the degree of preparedness of the education sector for ICT interventions may be achieved by completing a questionnaire that provides a rough profile of the preparedness and capacity of the education sector for effective ICT intervention. Such a profile will help in making decisions for ICTs in education that are realistic and appropriate. On the other hand, the profile may indicate that the pre-requisites for effective ICTs in education are not in place, and action is needed to ensure effective returns on any ICT-related intervention and investment.

It is recommended that the questionnaire be completed by a group designated by the Facilitation Team that is quite knowledgeable of the ICT situation in the education sector. This can be done in one of two ways:

The Facilitation Team sends the survey through the Toolkit to designated individuals who will complete it online. The Facilitation Team is able to view the results and save them.

The Team can download the questionnaire form and send it to the designated persons to be completed and returned. The Team can then enter the responses into the electronic forms and save the results for further use.



Present Education Usage of ICTs

Mapping the present education usage of ICTs may be achieved by completing a questionnaire provides a rough profile of the way schools use ICTs for educational purposes. Such a profile will help in making decisions for ICTs in education that are realistic and appropriate. On the other hand, the profile may indicate that the present practice of utilizing ICTs in education is not conducive for an efficient use of ICTs and may require some reform to maximize the returns from future investment in ICTs.

Under each profile indicator, there are five descriptors that fall along a continuum. Select one descriptor that best describes the current situation, although it may not represent the desired or prescribed goal.

1. Alignment between Technology and Instruction
ICTs are only used as voluntary enrichment materials.
ICTs are used by teachers to supplement conventional classroom teaching.
Beyond the above, ICTs are used by teachers to teach parts of a lesson.
Beyond the above, ICTs are used by students to learn certain parts of the curriculum.
In addition to the above, students use the technology to participate in national or international projects and competitions.

2. School Management
Schools do not use technology for management of their personnel or student data.
Schools are storing their data electronically but have no capability to analyze them.
Schools are storing and analyzing the data electronically to inform decisions about academic programs or personnel.
Schools are storing and sharing data with other schools and central offices (local, states or national).
In addition to the above, a central office maintains a database for all schools in the region. The data are used for decision-making purposes (e.g. ranking schools by level of poverty for funding purposes; collecting and analyzing standardized tests and providing results to the schools).

3. Technical Support for Schools
Technical support is not available for lack of skilled personnel in the region.
Technical support is available through contracts between the schools and private providers.
Technical support is available from a central office or vendor but only when a problem arises; schools may wait more than one week before support is provided.
Technical support is available from the central office or vendor on an ongoing basis (e.g. once a month); if any emergencies occur, it may take a week before support is provided.
Technical support is available on an as-needed-basis all working days and hours; most troubleshooting can occur promptly through conversation with the technician (over the phone, e-mail etc); in person support takes no more than 1 or 2 days to be obtained.
Present Education Usage of ICTs

Mapping the present education usage of ICTs may be achieved by completing a questionnaire provides a rough profile of the way schools use ICTs for educational purposes. Such a profile will help in making decisions for ICTs in education that are realistic and appropriate. On the other hand, the profile may indicate that the present practice of utilizing ICTs in education is not conducive for an efficient use of ICTs and may require some reform to maximize the returns from future investment in ICTs.

Under each profile indicator, there are five descriptors that fall along a continuum. Select one descriptor that best describes the current situation, although it may not represent the desired or prescribed goal.

1. Alignment between Technology and Instruction
ICTs are only used as voluntary enrichment materials.
ICTs are used by teachers to supplement conventional classroom teaching.
Beyond the above, ICTs are used by teachers to teach parts of a lesson.
Beyond the above, ICTs are used by students to learn certain parts of the curriculum.
In addition to the above, students use the technology to participate in national or international projects and competitions.

2. School Management
Schools do not use technology for management of their personnel or student data.
Schools are storing their data electronically but have no capability to analyze them.
Schools are storing and analyzing the data electronically to inform decisions about academic programs or personnel.
Schools are storing and sharing data with other schools and central offices (local, states or national).
In addition to the above, a central office maintains a database for all schools in the region. The data are used for decision-making purposes (e.g. ranking schools by level of poverty for funding purposes; collecting and analyzing standardized tests and providing results to the schools).

3. Technical Support for Schools
Technical support is not available for lack of skilled personnel in the region.
Technical support is available through contracts between the schools and private providers.
Technical support is available from a central office or vendor but only when a problem arises; schools may wait more than one week before support is provided.
Technical support is available from the central office or vendor on an ongoing basis (e.g. once a month); if any emergencies occur, it may take a week before support is provided.
Technical support is available on an as-needed-basis all working days and hours; most troubleshooting can occur promptly through conversation with the technician (over the phone, e-mail etc); in person support takes no more than 1 or 2 days to be obtained.
 
  Mapping Present Usage of ICTs in Education
 


Step 3: Mapping Present Usage of ICTs in Education

Mapping the present education usage of ICTs may be achieved by completing a questionnaire provides a rough profile of the way schools use ICTs for educational purposes. Such a profile will help in making decisions for ICTs in education that are realistic and appropriate. On the other hand, the profile may indicate that the present practice of utilizing ICTs in education is not conducive for an efficient use of ICTs and may require some reform to maximize the returns from future investment in ICTs.

It is recommended that the questionnaire be completed by a group designated by the Facilitation Team that is quite knowledgeable about the ICT situation in the education sector. Such group may include supervisors (inspectors), school principals and teachers. This can be done in one of two ways:

The Facilitation Team sends the survey through the Toolkit to designated individuals who will complete it online. The Facilitation Team is able to view the results and save them.

The Team can download the questionnaire form and send it to the designated persons to be completed and returned. The Team can then enter the responses into the electronic forms and save the results for further use.